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Mosaic Science Podcast

The Mosaic Science Podcast - audio documentaries and audio versions of our weekly longread. Mosaic is a digital magazine that publishes compelling stories exploring the science of life. Produced by the Wellcome Trust. More at mosaicscience.com.
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Now displaying: Page 4
Apr 11, 2016

In Northern Ireland, more people took their own lives in the 16 years after the Troubles than died during them. Why? Lyra McKee finds out.

 

Written by Lyra McKee

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend The male suicides: how social perfectionism kills by Will Storr, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Apr 7, 2016

Mosaic celebrates its second year anniversary in March. To mark this, we'll be sharing a series of 15min talks featuring Mosaic writers and stories produced in association with the inspiration and ideas series 5x15.

 

Here, Charles Fernyhough explores what he has learned in over a decade of study on auditory hallucinations - people who hear voices. You can hear more from him in the Mosaic radio documentary Voices in the dark on Mosaic and its podcast.

 
Charles Fernyhough is the author of Pieces of Light and The Baby in the Mirror, as well as two novels, The Auctioneer and A Box of Birds, and has contributed to the GuardianTIME IdeasSunday Telegraph, Financial TimesSydney Morning Herald, and Focus Magazine. He has published many scientific articles on the relation between language and thought, and his ideas on thinking as a dialogue with the self have been influential in several fields. He is a part-time Professor in Psychology at Durham University, where he directs Hearing the Voice, a project on inner voices funded by the Wellcome Trust. His latest book, The Voices Within: The History and Science of How We Talk to Ourselves, will be published by Profile in April 2016. 

 

This talk was recorded at London's Conway Hall on 16 March 2016 as part of the 5x15-Mosaic event 'Stories from the future of medicine'.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Apr 4, 2016

If you could take the high out of drugs, what would be the point in taking them? Sujata Gupta meets the unorthodox doctor who thinks he can block some of the world's most addictive pills.

 

Written by Sujata Gupta

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Saved: How addicts gained the power to reverse overdoses by Carrie Arnold, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Mar 31, 2016

Mosaic celebrates its second year anniversary in March. To mark this, we'll be sharing a series of 15min talks featuring Mosaic writers and stories produced in association with the inspiration and ideas series 5x15.

Jo Marchant discusses the connections between the mind and the immune system, and how we might harness conditioning and the placebo effect to revolutionise medicine. You can find her story You can train your body into thinking its had medicine on Mosaic.

Jo Marchant is an award-winning science journalist based in London. She has a PhD genetics and medical microbiology from St Bartholomew’s Hospital Medical College in London, and an MSc in Science Communication from Imperial College London. She has worked as an editor at New Scientist and Nature and her articles have appeared in publications including the Guardian, Wired UK, The Observer Review, and New Scientist. Her radio and TV appearances include BBC Radio 4’s Start the Week and Today programmes, CNN and National Geographic. Her most recent book, Cure, is a remarkable scientific examination into the relationship between our minds and our bodies. 
 

This talk was recorded at London's Conway Hall on 16 March 2016 as part of the 5x15-Mosaic event 'Stories from the future of medicine'.

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Mar 28, 2016

Ghana has plenty of water. So why do its people buy plastic pouches from street vendors? Shaun Raviv investigates.

 

Written by Shaun Raviv

Read by Pip Mayo

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Blood Speaks by Rose George, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Mar 24, 2016

Mosaic celebrates its second year anniversary in March. To mark this, we'll be sharing a series of 15min talks featuring Mosaic writers and stories produced in association with the inspiration and ideas series 5x15.

In the first, Roger Highfield discusses consciousness, brain scanning and permanent vegetative state. You can find his story The Mind Readers on Mosaic and its podcast.

Roger Highfield was born in Wales, raised in north London and became the first person to bounce a neutron off a soap bubble. He was the science editor of The Daily Telegraph for two decades and the editor of New Scientist between 2008 and 2011. Today, he is the Director of External Affairs at the Science Museum Group. Roger Highfield has written seven books, most recently Supercooperators: The Mathematics of Evolution, Altruism and Human Behaviour, and published thousands of articles in newspapers and magazines.

This talk was recorded at London's Conway Hall on 16 March 2016 as part of the 5x15-Mosaic event 'Stories from the future of medicine'.

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

 

Mar 21, 2016

We all have an inner voice. But for some, hearing voices can be much more distinct and unusual. Through their stories we explore what it means to hear voices and discover how the phenomenon is being understood, from medieval tales of demonic visions to childhood language cognition, a Dutch psychiatrist helping voice hearers find meaning in their voices, and a pioneering ‘avatar’ therapy using computer technology.

 

Produced and narrated by Chris Chapman
Written by Chris Chapman and Penny Bailey

 

See the transcript of this story, along with galleries and other related extras, and more stories on mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Can deaf people hear voices? Jemima Hodkinson investigates a seemingly paradoxical experience. And hear Dr Paul Fletcher tell Chris Chapman why We’re all on the verge of hallucinating.

This documentary was first broadcast in December 2014.

Mar 14, 2016

In the war against malaria, one small corner of the globe has repeatedly turned the tide, rendering our best weapons moot and medicine on the brink of defeat. Ed Yong reports.

 

Written by Ed Yong

Read by Pip Mayo

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Audio editing by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend DIY diagnosis: how an extreme athlete uncovered her own genetic flaw, also by Ed Yong and also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

 

Mar 7, 2016

Brian Bartlett lost his leg at 24. Rose Eveleth hears how a man who just wanted to ski again invented a new kind of knee.

 

 

Written by Rose Eveleth

 

Read by Kirsten Irving

 

Produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Edited (audio) by Geoff Marsh

 

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend The mirror man by Srinath Perur, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Feb 29, 2016

There are a few things science doesn’t know about the menopause: what it’s for, how it works and how best to treat it. Approaching her second – yes, second – menopause, Rose George finds herself with more questions than answers.

 

Written by Rose George

 

Produced by The Guardian

 

This narration appears courtesy of The Guardian Long Read

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Blood speaks, also by Rose George, and also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Feb 22, 2016

In East Harlem, four times as many adults have diabetes as in the neighbouring Upper East Side. Meera Senthilingam meets the New Yorkers stopping poverty being a death sentence.

Audio producer: Meera Senthilingam
Fact checker: Laura Dawes
Editor: Mun-Keat Looi

See an accompanying photo tour of Harlem and read a full transcript for this story on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend Voices in the dark: what it's like to hear voices, another Mosaic audio documentary also available on our podcast.

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Feb 15, 2016

The need to mend broken hearts has never been greater. But what if we could simply manufacture a new one? Alex O’Brien studies the legacy of Texan surgeons and artificial hearts.

 

Written by Alex O'Brien

 

Read by Pip Mayo

 

Produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Edited (audio) by Ellie Pinney

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend The man with the golden blood by Penny Bailey, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Feb 8, 2016

Telling cancer from non-cancer is tough for brain surgeons. Scorpions, Amazon.com and the legacy of a dying girl might change that, writes Alex O'Brien.

 

Written by Alex O'Brien

 

Read by Kirsten Irving

 

Produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Decisions on a knife edge by Charlotte Huff, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Feb 1, 2016

A special episode brought to you by Gastropod, the podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history.

 

Calories consumed minus calories burned: it’s the simple formula for weight loss or gain. But dieters often find that it doesn’t work. Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley investigate in this episode of Gastropod, and in their Mosaic feature, Why the calorie is broken.

 

For most of us, the calorie is just a number on the back of the packet or on the display at the gym. But what is it, exactly? And how did we end up with this one unit with which to measure our food? Is a calorie the same no matter what type of food it comes from? And is one calorie for you exactly the same as one calorie for me? To find out, Cynthia and Nicola visit the special rooms scientists use to measure how many calories we burn, and the labs where researchers are discovering that the calorie is broken. And they pose the question: if not the calorie, then what?

 

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend How we became the heaviest drinkers in a century by Chrissie Giles.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic and Gastropod podcasts on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review!

Jan 25, 2016

Oklahoma has lost a million pounds of fat. Ian Birrell asks how – and whether declaring ‘war on obesity’ can really change a city’s infrastructure and encourage healthy living.

 

Written by Ian Birrell

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend South Africa’s obesity crisis: the shape of things to come?, also by Ian Birrell.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Jan 18, 2016

Trapped by the Cold War and scarred after a failed revolution, Hungary fought one of its greatest battles against polio.

 

Written by Penny Bailey
Read by Pip Mayo
Audio editor Geoff Marsh
Produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Read the full text original, as published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Unspoken: the far-east prisoners of war, also available on our podcast.

Jan 11, 2016

What drives people to run a marathon? Join Hayley Birch as she tackles 26.2 miles, aided by science.

 

Written by Hayley Birch

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Edited by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend City cycling: health vs hazard, by Lesley Evans Ogden, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Jan 4, 2016

The most powerful computers in the world cannot perform accurate real-time translation. Yet interpreters do it with ease. Geoff Watts meets the neuroscientists who are starting to explain this remarkable ability.

 

Written and read by Geoff Watts
Produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Read the full text original, as published on Mosaic. 

 

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Can you think yourself into a different person? by Will Storr.

Dec 28, 2015

"Very few people in the world knew his blood type did - could - exist."

 

From vein to blood bank, meet the donors, patients, doctors and scientists involved in the complex global network of rare – and very rare – blood.

 

Written by Penny Bailey, read by Pip Mayo and produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Read the full text original, as published on mosaicscience.com.

 

If you liked this story, we recommend listening to Why do we have blood types? by Carl Zimmer, and Blood Speaks by Rose George, also available as podcasts.

Dec 21, 2015

Chrissie Giles on her generation’s climb to Peak Booze

 

 

Written and read by Chrissie Giles

Produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Read the full text original, published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

 

If you liked this story, we recommend Breaking bad news, also by Chrissie Giles and also available on our podcast.

Dec 14, 2015

Applying mild electrical currents to your head could take away pain, help memory and improve attention – and the US military is very interested.

Written by Emma Young

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend Hacking the nervous system, by Gaia Vince, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

 
Nov 30, 2015

Neil Steinberg takes a journey through the past and present to explore what it’s like to look different.

 

Written by Neil Steinberg

Read by Pip Mayo

Produced by Barry J Gibb

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend Sex, lives and disability, by Katharine Quarmby, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Nov 23, 2015

Losing your sense of smell can fundamentally change the way you relate to other people.

 

Written by Emma Young

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Edited by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend Why do we have allergies?, by Carl Zimmer, also available on our podcast.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review.

Nov 16, 2015

A special episode brought to you by Gastropod, the podcast that looks at food through the lens of science and history.

Are you part of Generation Peak Booze? Dive into the factors behind the ups and downs in alcohol consumption in the UK and US over the course of the twentieth century, as Gastropod hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley explore the long-term health effects of peak booze, and get a sneak peek at the synthetic alcohol of the future. 

They interview Mosaic's Chrissie Giles about her revealing story about the booziest generation in a century. When Chrissie looked at her drinking habits, they didn't seem particularly remarkable. Sneaking drinks at fourteen, vomiting in the dorm sink at university, spending her twenties getting wasted with her mates every weekend: that's just what everybody did, right? But when she looked at the data, Chrissie realised that her generation represented a peak in British drinking, which has been on a downhill trend since 2004. Intrigued, she dug into the larger historical shifts behind the data, uncovering a story that ranges from a 1930s anthropological study of the pub to the impact of selfie culture today. Gastropod compare her findings with the data on drinking in the US and draw on insights from neuropsychopharmacologist David Nutt to explore the effects of regulation and cultural trends on alcohol consumption.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic and Gastropod podcasts on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review!

Nov 9, 2015

One nerve connects your vital organs, sensing and shaping your health. If we learn to control it, the future of medicine will be electric. 

 

Written by Gaia Vince

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Edited by Geoff Marsh

 

Read the full text original and accompanying extras published on Mosaic.

For more stories visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend Can you supercharge your brain?, by Emma Young.

 

Subscribe to the Mosaic podcast on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating and review!

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