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Mosaic Science Podcast

The Mosaic Science Podcast - audio documentaries and audio versions of our weekly longread. Mosaic is a digital magazine that publishes compelling stories exploring the science of life. Produced by the Wellcome Trust. More at mosaicscience.com.
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Now displaying: 2019
Apr 15, 2019

In the early 2000s, when there were just two psychiatrists serving over 12 million people, Zimbabwe had to get creative to treat depression. Now, one bright idea – the Friendship Bench – is spreading far and wide.

Written by Alex Riley. Read by Kirsten Irving. Produced by Graihagh Jackson.

To read the story, visit mosaicscience.com

If you like this story, we recommend How To Get To A World Without Suicide by Simon Usborne. 

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Apr 8, 2019

Can a grand vision of 4,000 free public gyms overcome inequality and fight Brazil’s health crisis? Catherine de Lange reports.

Written by Catherine de Lange, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend listening to City Cycling: Health Versus Hazard by Ian Birrell, also available as a podcast.

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Apr 1, 2019

New biomedical techniques, like next-generation genome sequencing, are creating vast amounts of data and transforming the scientific landscape. They’re leading to unimaginable breakthroughs – but leaving researchers racing to keep up.

Editor: Rob Reddick
Copyeditor: Tom Freeman
Art director: Charlie Hall
Fact checker: Francine Almash
Illustrator: Dávid Biró
 
To read the story, visit mosaicscience.com. If you liked this story, we recommend 'The DNA detectives hunting the causes of cancer' by Kat Arney.
Mar 25, 2019

Boxers know they risk injury in the ring. But there’s a more insidious danger they don’t often talk about: the long-term brain damage that repeated blows to the head can cause. Lyra McKee meets the families who are breaking the silence.

Written by Lyra McKee. 
Read by Kirsten Irving. 
Illustrated by Gabby Laurent. 
Produced by Barry J. Gibb. 

To read the story, visit mosaicscience.com. 

 

If you liked this story, we recommend 'The Alzheimer's Enigma' by Michael Regnier.

Mar 18, 2019

Millions of people are left dead or disabled by surgical complications each year when one simple piece of kit could have saved them. Jane Feinmann discovers how it has helped transform medicine in Mongolia.

Written by Jane Feinmann. 
Read by Rebecca McIntosh. 
Produced by Graihagh Jackson. 

If you liked this story, we recommend DIY prosthetics: the extreme athlete who built a new knee by Rose Eveleth, also available as a podcast.

Mar 11, 2019

Is there real science in the spiritualism of meditation? Jo Marchant meets a Nobel Prize-winner who thinks so.

Written by Jo Marchant
Read by Pip Mayo
Produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read this story, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Secrets-of-the-strong-minded by Emma Young, also available as a podcast.

Mar 4, 2019

Half of people with Parkinson’s disease experience hallucinations, paranoia and delusions. Mary O’Hara reports on a new hope.

Written by Mary O'Hara

Read by Michael Regnier

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

Feb 25, 2019

Priyanka Pulla asks if there can ever be legitimacy in ‘quackery’.

Written by Priyanka Pulla, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh.

If you liked this story, we recommend Can meditation really slow ageing? by Mary Rose Abraham, also available as a podcast.

Feb 18, 2019

One in ten people struggle to recognise their emotions. New research suggests a vital link between our ability to sense our physical bodies and knowing how we feel.

Written by Emma Young

Read by Charlotte Hussey 

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

Feb 11, 2019

Why is asbestos still killing people? Nic Fleming finds out in a twisting tale of industry cover-ups and misinformation that spans decades.

Written by Nic Fleming, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

Feb 4, 2019

A network of compassionate volunteers caring for their terminally ill neighbours is allowing more people in Kerala, India, to end their days at peace and at home. Jeremy Laurance meets the man leading the movement.

Written by Jeremy Laurance

Read by Graihagh Jackson

Produced by Graihagh Jackson 

If you liked this story, we recommend 'The sex workers who are stopping HIV', also available as an audiobook. 

Jan 28, 2019

Having stamped out a number of tropical diseases – including malaria – decades ago, is America today complacent about a rising wave of infectious disease? By Carrie Arnold.

Written by Carrie Arnold, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh

Jan 21, 2019

The need to mend broken hearts has never been greater. But what if we could simply manufacture a new one? Alex O’Brien studies the legacy of Texan surgeons and artificial hearts.

Written by Alex O'Brien, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Ellie Pinney.

Jan 14, 2019

An early halt to a trial of deep brain stimulation for depression reveals little about the treatment but more about the changing nature of clinical trials.

Written by David Dobbs

Read by Brian Yim Lim

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

Jan 7, 2019

Calories consumed minus calories burned: it’s the simple formula for weight loss or gain. But dieters often find that it doesn’t work. Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley of Gastropod investigate.

Written by Cynthia Graber, read by Charlotte Hussey, produced by Graihagh Jackson.

For more stories and to read the original text, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend The fat city that declared war on obesity, by Ian Birrell, also available as a podcast. 

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