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Mosaic Science Podcast

The Mosaic Science Podcast - audio documentaries and audio versions of our weekly longread. Mosaic is a digital magazine that publishes compelling stories exploring the science of life. Produced by the Wellcome Trust. More at mosaicscience.com.
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Now displaying: September, 2016
Sep 26, 2016

"Gomez is one of Achatz's regular patients at the A C Camargo Cancer Center in São Paulo, Brazil. He is extraordinarily susceptible to cancer. So too are many members of his extended family; cancer is so common among them - and premature death so painfully familiar - that until they learned very recently of the cause, some believed their family was cursed. Gomez's is not the only family affected. The 'cure' afflicts hundreds of thousands of people in Brazil."

The startling discovery that hundreds of thousands of Brazilians have a genetic mutation that undermines their ability to resist cancer is helping labs worldwide in their search for new treatments for the disease. Sue Armstrong reports."

Written by Sue Armstrong, read by Pip Mayo, audio editing by Jen Whyntie.

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Decisions-on-a-knife-edge by Charlotte Huff, also available as a podcast.

 

#brazil #cancer #mutation #genetics #disease #health #society #saopaolo #genes

Sep 16, 2016

"Kim is unique. Throughout her life she had built up a constellation of values and impulses - endurance, single-mindedness, self-reliance and opposition to authority - that all clicked in when she was confronted with her twin diagnoses. She was predisposed to win. Not everyone is. But as genetic information becomes cheaper, more accessible and more organised, that barrier may lower."

When Kim Goodsell discovered that she had two extremely rare genetic diseases, she taught herself genetics to help find out why.

Written by Ed Yong, read by Segun Akingbola and produced by Barry J Gibb

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Cradle-of-resistance, Ed Yong's report from the Thai-Myanmar border, one of the last bastions in the fight against malaria drug resistance.

 

Sep 12, 2016

"The best way to get Brian to do something is to tell him that he can’t. Within a year of the accident, Brian was back on the slopes, skiing with disabled ski teams. In his first year he made it to the International Paralympic Committee’s Alpine Skiing World Cup, and came in seventh in the world. But it wasn’t enough. It wasn’t the same."

Brian Bartlett lost his leg at 24. Rose Eveleth hears how a man who just wanted to ski again invented a new kind of knee.

Written by Rose Eveleth, read by Kirsten Irving and produced by Jen Whyntie.

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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Sep 5, 2016

"By the time you read this, I’ll be recovering from the Brighton Marathon. What I’ve learned is that running a marathon isn’t about running a marathon. I mean, it is and it isn’t. I’ll explain what I mean later. But I began by asking what it takes to run 26.2 miles – are hard work and determination enough, or is there something else? Something you’re born with?"

 

What drives people to run a marathon? Join Hayley Birch as she tackles 26.2 miles, aided by science.

 

Written by Hayley Birch, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, edited by Geoff Marsh

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend Brazil's billion-dollar gym experiment by Catherine de Lange, also available as a podcast. 

 

Sep 1, 2016

"In Canada at least, wheelchair basketball is a chance for disabled and able-bodied athletes to compete with and against each other. I knew in advance that some of the players I was watching do not use wheelchairs off the court, and that these chairs are sporting kit like hockey sticks or bicycles. Yet seeing those players stand up still profoundly challenged my preconceptions. I am so accustomed to thinking of wheelchair use in binary terms: you either use one or you don’t. Now I’m struggling to unlearn that notion."

 

In Canada, wheelchair basketball brings people together regardless of their abilities. Lesley Evans Ogden asks whether this kind of integration could help dispel stigma, discrimination and misconceptions about disability more widely.

 

Written by Lesley Evans Ogden, read by Kirsten Irving, audio editing by Jen Whyntie.

 

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

 

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If you liked this story, we recommend City cycling: health versus hazard by Lesley Evans Ogden, also available as a podcast. 

 

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