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Mosaic Science Podcast

The Mosaic Science Podcast - audio documentaries and audio versions of our weekly longread. Mosaic is a digital magazine that publishes compelling stories exploring the science of life. Produced by the Wellcome Trust. More at mosaicscience.com.
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Now displaying: Page 1
Mar 18, 2019

Millions of people are left dead or disabled by surgical complications each year when one simple piece of kit could have saved them. Jane Feinmann discovers how it has helped transform medicine in Mongolia.

Written by Jane Feinmann. 
Read by Rebecca McIntosh. 
Produced by Graihagh Jackson. 

If you liked this story, we recommend DIY prosthetics: the extreme athlete who built a new knee by Rose Eveleth, also available as a podcast.

Mar 11, 2019

Is there real science in the spiritualism of meditation? Jo Marchant meets a Nobel Prize-winner who thinks so.

Written by Jo Marchant
Read by Pip Mayo
Produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read this story, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Secrets-of-the-strong-minded by Emma Young, also available as a podcast.

Mar 4, 2019

Half of people with Parkinson’s disease experience hallucinations, paranoia and delusions. Mary O’Hara reports on a new hope.

Written by Mary O'Hara

Read by Michael Regnier

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

Feb 25, 2019

Priyanka Pulla asks if there can ever be legitimacy in ‘quackery’.

Written by Priyanka Pulla, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh.

If you liked this story, we recommend Can meditation really slow ageing? by Mary Rose Abraham, also available as a podcast.

Feb 18, 2019

One in ten people struggle to recognise their emotions. New research suggests a vital link between our ability to sense our physical bodies and knowing how we feel.

Written by Emma Young

Read by Charlotte Hussey 

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

Feb 11, 2019

Why is asbestos still killing people? Nic Fleming finds out in a twisting tale of industry cover-ups and misinformation that spans decades.

Written by Nic Fleming, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb

Feb 4, 2019

A network of compassionate volunteers caring for their terminally ill neighbours is allowing more people in Kerala, India, to end their days at peace and at home. Jeremy Laurance meets the man leading the movement.

Written by Jeremy Laurance

Read by Graihagh Jackson

Produced by Graihagh Jackson 

If you liked this story, we recommend 'The sex workers who are stopping HIV', also available as an audiobook. 

Jan 28, 2019

Having stamped out a number of tropical diseases – including malaria – decades ago, is America today complacent about a rising wave of infectious disease? By Carrie Arnold.

Written by Carrie Arnold, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh

Jan 21, 2019

The need to mend broken hearts has never been greater. But what if we could simply manufacture a new one? Alex O’Brien studies the legacy of Texan surgeons and artificial hearts.

Written by Alex O'Brien, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Ellie Pinney.

Jan 14, 2019

An early halt to a trial of deep brain stimulation for depression reveals little about the treatment but more about the changing nature of clinical trials.

Written by David Dobbs

Read by Brian Yim Lim

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

Jan 7, 2019

Calories consumed minus calories burned: it’s the simple formula for weight loss or gain. But dieters often find that it doesn’t work. Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley of Gastropod investigate.

Written by Cynthia Graber, read by Charlotte Hussey, produced by Graihagh Jackson.

For more stories and to read the original text, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend The fat city that declared war on obesity, by Ian Birrell, also available as a podcast. 

Dec 31, 2018

Notoriously illegal and synonymous with hedonism, LSD and ecstasy started life as aids to psychotherapy. Sam Wong meets the band of psychiatrists who are looking to reclaim them for medicine again.

Written by Sam Wong, read by Pip Mayo, produced by Barry J Gibb, audio editing by Geoff Marsh

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend Saved: How addicts gained the power to reverse overdoses, also available as a podcast. 

Dec 24, 2018

Telling cancer from non-cancer is tough for brain surgeons. Scorpions, Amazon.com and the legacy of a dying girl might change that, writes Alex O'Brien.

Written by Alex O'Brien, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

If you liked this story, we recommend listening to Decisions on a knife edge, by Charlotte Huff, also available as a podcast. 

Dec 17, 2018

Women’s reproductive rights are under attack across the globe. Sophie Cousins investigates the challenges women face in accessing abortion and contraception in two very different countries – India and the USA.

Written by Sophie Cousins

Read by Kirsten Irving 

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

If you liked this story, we recommend Postpartum psychosis: "I'm afraid of how you'll judge me, as a mother and as a person", by Catherine Carver, also available as an audiobook. 

Dec 10, 2018

Oklahoma has lost a million pounds of fat. Ian Birrell asks how – and whether declaring ‘war on obesity’ can really change a city’s infrastructure and encourage healthy living.

Written by Ian Birrell, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

If you liked this story, we recommend listening to Brazil's billion dollar gym experiment by Ian Birrell, also available as a podcast. 

Dec 3, 2018

Headlines scream about “epidemics” of shootings and stabbings – but what if we took that literally? From Chicago to Glasgow, treating violence as a public health problem has produced great results.

Written by Samira Shackle

Read by Kirsten Irving

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'The women that kill, abuse and torture' by Katarine Quarmby, also available as a podcast. 

Nov 26, 2018

Applying mild electrical currents to your head could take away pain, help memory and improve attention – and the US military is very interested. Emma Young reports.

Written by Emma Young, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb

If you liked this story, we recommend Can you think yourself into a different person? by Will Story, also available as a podcast.

Nov 19, 2018

In Finland, people whose sickness is linked to certain buildings fear being labelled as mentally ill, while scientists search for evidence that their condition is ‘real’.

Written by Shayla Love

Read by Graihagh Jackson 

If you liked this story, we recommend Shayla Love's story 'Meet the dogs with OCD', also available as a podcast. 

 

Nov 12, 2018

One nerve connects your vital organs, sensing and shaping your health. If we learn to control it, the future of medicine will be electric.

Written by Gaia Vince, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, edited by Geoff Marsh

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Can-you-supercharge-your-brain by Emma Young, also available as a podcast.

Nov 5, 2018

When doctors in rural Italy began to see a surge in cancer cases, they were baffled. Then they made the link with industrial waste being dumped by local crime syndicates. Ian Birrell learns about the tragic consequences. 

Written by Ian Birrell

Read by Michael Regnier

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Brazil's cancer curse' by Sue Armstrong, also available as a podcast. 

Oct 29, 2018

"Polio was unpredictable. Often no more harmful than any other childhood infection, it could on occasion ‘turn’ with swift, inexplicable savagery, destroying a child’s nerve cells and leaving him paralysed for life. If it damaged the nerves controlling his lungs they could freeze up and György would either die or spend the rest of his life inside an iron lung that breathed for him."

Trapped by the Cold War and scarred after a failed revolution, Hungary fought one of its greatest battles against polio.

Written by Penny Bailey, read by Pip Mayo, audio editor Geoff Marsh, produced by Barry J Gibb

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Prisoners-of-war, also available on our podcast.

Oct 23, 2018

Sex workers in Mozambique are providing health support to those at the margins of society. They face political and financial challenges, but against the odds they are helping thousands.

Written by Jules Montague 

Read by Kirsten Irving 

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'How HIV became a matter of international security' by Alexandra Ossola, available to read here. 

Oct 15, 2018

"Losing enjoyment of food and drink is a common complaint for people who lose their sense of smell. You can taste sweet, salty, bitter, sour and umami with your tongue. More complex flavours – like grapefruit or barbecued steak – depend on smell. But for Nick, as for many people who can’t smell, there’s another category of loss altogether."

Losing your sense of smell can fundamentally change the way you relate to other people.

Written by Emma Young, read by Kirsten Irving, produced by Barry J Gibb, edited by Geoff Marsh

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend Mosaicscience – Why-do-we-have-allergies by Carl Zimmer, also available as a podcast.

 

Oct 8, 2018

Melioidosis is a bacterial infection that quietly causes thousands of deaths each year. Meet the doctor who made it his mission to make the world take notice.

Written by Carrie Arnold

Read by Michael Regnier

Produced by Graihagh Jackson

For more stories and to read the text original, visit mosaicscience.com

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If you liked this story, we recommend 'Hunting the silent killer' by Patrick Strudwick, also available as a podcast. 

Oct 1, 2018

In a world obsessed with beauty, living with a facial disfigurement can be hard. Neil Steinberg explores the past and present to find out what it’s like to look different.

Written by Neil Steinberg

Read by Pip Mayo

Produced by Barry J Gibb

Edited by Geoff Marsh

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If you liked this podcast, we recommend, 'How far would you go to be able to smile' by Neil Steinberg. 

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